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1. Last Wednesday On November 17, I Visited Some Friends.

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Posted on Thu, 23 Jun 2022
Question: 1.     Last Wednesday on November 17, I visited some friends. While I was there I had a slight stomach ache and so I left her house.
2.     At home I had a loose bowel movement accompanied by sweats. I also felt completely drained.
3.     Next thing I knew I was on the tiled floor of my master bathroom. It seems like I passed out or fainted.
4.     I was confused when I came to find myself on the floor and wondered how I got there, I got up immediately and was feeling very warm. Peeled off my clothes and got on my bed.
5.     When I touched my scalp there was a big lump and I was hurting. Well I iced my head and the swelling came down.
6.     I had an appointment with my internist on Monday.
7.     I am still having pain all over body so I saw her again last evening.
8.     At ER they did EKG and ran an enzyme test and sent me home.
doctor
Answered by Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar (19 hours later)
Brief Answer:
please provide more information

Detailed Answer:
Hello,
your symptoms usually indicate either food poisoning or some other type of gastroenteritis. When a patient feels like a loose bowel movement is imminent, the blood pressure may dive to low levels, causing faintness and cold sweating. It seems that this is what happened to you the other day and after you fainted, you bumped your head on the floor.

There are a few major concerns in such cases:
- a patient may faint because of gastrointestinal bleeding. A loose bowel movement may indicate gastrointestinal bleeding, particularly when there's visible blood mixed with the stool or when the stool is black. Checking the stool color is usually sufficient to exclude this scenario.
- An head injury may cause intracranial bleeding which is a very serious situation. A CT scan of the head can exclude this diagnosis.
- there are other serious diagnoses that may lead to faintness as well like cardiovascular incidents. The enzyme tests were probably done for this purpose.

If you can provide more details about what happened in the ER, perhaps I could give you a more detailed answer.

Best Regards,
Dr. Panagiotis Zografakis,
Internal Medicine Specialist
Note: For more detailed guidance, please consult an Internal Medicine Specialist, with your latest reports. Click here..

Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
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Answered by
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Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar

General & Family Physician

Practicing since :2004

Answered : 2241 Questions

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1. Last Wednesday On November 17, I Visited Some Friends.

Brief Answer: please provide more information Detailed Answer: Hello, your symptoms usually indicate either food poisoning or some other type of gastroenteritis. When a patient feels like a loose bowel movement is imminent, the blood pressure may dive to low levels, causing faintness and cold sweating. It seems that this is what happened to you the other day and after you fainted, you bumped your head on the floor. There are a few major concerns in such cases: - a patient may faint because of gastrointestinal bleeding. A loose bowel movement may indicate gastrointestinal bleeding, particularly when there's visible blood mixed with the stool or when the stool is black. Checking the stool color is usually sufficient to exclude this scenario. - An head injury may cause intracranial bleeding which is a very serious situation. A CT scan of the head can exclude this diagnosis. - there are other serious diagnoses that may lead to faintness as well like cardiovascular incidents. The enzyme tests were probably done for this purpose. If you can provide more details about what happened in the ER, perhaps I could give you a more detailed answer. Best Regards, Dr. Panagiotis Zografakis, Internal Medicine Specialist