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I Have Had A Recurring Pain In My Back, Near

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Posted on Wed, 1 Jul 2020
Question: I have had a recurring pain in my back, near my left shoulder blade. I've also been doing a lot of painting of my house over the last two months so obviously this could be a muscular thing. However, the pain is staying pretty much in that one spot, and I am nervous about a possible lung or heart connection. I have a doctor appointment for next Tuesday, and it is only via video. How do I know if the shoulderblade pain is serious or muscle-related?
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Follow up: Dr. Ilir Sharka (0 minute later)
I have had a recurring pain in my back, near my left shoulder blade. I've also been doing a lot of painting of my house over the last two months so obviously this could be a muscular thing. However, the pain is staying pretty much in that one spot, and I am nervous about a possible lung or heart connection. I have a doctor appointment for next Tuesday, and it is only via video. How do I know if the shoulderblade pain is serious or muscle-related?
doctor
Answered by Dr. Ilir Sharka (2 hours later)
Brief Answer:
I would explain as follows:

Detailed Answer:
Hello!

Welcome on - Ask a Doctor - service!

I understand your concern, and would like to explain that there are differences in clinical presentation of an extra-cardiac chest pain when compared with pain due to cardiac ischemia.

A muscular-skeletal pain is easily modulated by body movements, posture changes; may be provoked by local palpation, coughing, deep breathing, etc.

Not rarely local inflammation findings may be found in the settings of a musculoskeletal disorder, such as local swelling, painful areas on touching; these areas are well localized on the body surface, the pain is sharper, more frequently localized in small well-defined area.

In opposite of the above prescription, pain of cardiac origin is quite never modulated by body posture changes, breathing, coughing, shows no local signs of inflammation, is barely well-defined on a surface area, is more often dull coming from deep inside the body.

Anyways there are also cases of atypical pain presentation.

Coming to your case, it would be necessary to provide additional information about the pain characteristics considering the above explanations. is your pain modulated? or influenced by any factor? Any local signs?

It seems to be of extra-cardiac origin anyways, I would prefer to have more underlying information to give a more precise opinion.

I remain at your disposal for any further discussions.

Kind regards,

Dr. Ilir Sharka
cardiologist
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
doctor
Answered by Dr. Ilir Sharka (0 minute later)
Brief Answer:
I would explain as follows:

Detailed Answer:
Hello!

Welcome on - Ask a Doctor - service!

I understand your concern, and would like to explain that there are differences in clinical presentation of an extra-cardiac chest pain when compared with pain due to cardiac ischemia.

A muscular-skeletal pain is easily modulated by body movements, posture changes; may be provoked by local palpation, coughing, deep breathing, etc.

Not rarely local inflammation findings may be found in the settings of a musculoskeletal disorder, such as local swelling, painful areas on touching; these areas are well localized on the body surface, the pain is sharper, more frequently localized in small well-defined area.

In opposite of the above prescription, pain of cardiac origin is quite never modulated by body posture changes, breathing, coughing, shows no local signs of inflammation, is barely well-defined on a surface area, is more often dull coming from deep inside the body.

Anyways there are also cases of atypical pain presentation.

Coming to your case, it would be necessary to provide additional information about the pain characteristics considering the above explanations. is your pain modulated? or influenced by any factor? Any local signs?

It seems to be of extra-cardiac origin anyways, I would prefer to have more underlying information to give a more precise opinion.

I remain at your disposal for any further discussions.

Kind regards,

Dr. Ilir Sharka
cardiologist
Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
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Follow up: Dr. Ilir Sharka (36 minutes later)
It began as just a feeling of discomfort in the upper left part of my back. I always have slightly sore back, so I didn't think much of it. Then it started coming back to just the one spot, and it was still more of a discomfort, but so uncomfortable that sometimes I couldn't sleep. Then some days it would seem to be getting better, but then would return. It is true that since late March I've been doing a lot of painting in my house, (But with my right hand). I did use my left hand often to lift the heavy paint pot.

My concerns are always exacerbated by the fact that I had a grandmother (on my mother's side) who died of a heart attack, so I get anxious about any potential sign.

Today I am still more uncomfortable in that spot rather than in pain, although I've had some painful throbs. The one position that has provided relief is lying on my stomach on the hard wood floor. Then I don't seem to feel the discomfort as much.



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Follow up: Dr. Ilir Sharka (0 minute later)
It began as just a feeling of discomfort in the upper left part of my back. I always have slightly sore back, so I didn't think much of it. Then it started coming back to just the one spot, and it was still more of a discomfort, but so uncomfortable that sometimes I couldn't sleep. Then some days it would seem to be getting better, but then would return. It is true that since late March I've been doing a lot of painting in my house, (But with my right hand). I did use my left hand often to lift the heavy paint pot.

My concerns are always exacerbated by the fact that I had a grandmother (on my mother's side) who died of a heart attack, so I get anxious about any potential sign.

Today I am still more uncomfortable in that spot rather than in pain, although I've had some painful throbs. The one position that has provided relief is lying on my stomach on the hard wood floor. Then I don't seem to feel the discomfort as much.



doctor
Answered by Dr. Ilir Sharka (17 hours later)
Brief Answer:
I would exclude any possible cardiac issues based on your description.

Detailed Answer:
Hello again!

Based on your description of your complaints I would exclude any possible cardiac issues.

As the discomfort is relieved by a certain body position, it is very indicative of a musculo-skeletal pain.

So, in my opinion, there is no reason to panic!

I would recommend avoiding straining physical activity in the next days and try some painkillers (acetaminophen or ibuprofen). If the pain is relieved by these drugs, this would be another argument in favor of a musculo-skeletal pain.

Some warm packs locally can help too.

Hope you will find this answer helpful!

If you have any other questions, please don't hesitate to ask me again!

Wishing all the best,

Dr. Iliri


Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
doctor
Answered by Dr. Ilir Sharka (0 minute later)
Brief Answer:
I would exclude any possible cardiac issues based on your description.

Detailed Answer:
Hello again!

Based on your description of your complaints I would exclude any possible cardiac issues.

As the discomfort is relieved by a certain body position, it is very indicative of a musculo-skeletal pain.

So, in my opinion, there is no reason to panic!

I would recommend avoiding straining physical activity in the next days and try some painkillers (acetaminophen or ibuprofen). If the pain is relieved by these drugs, this would be another argument in favor of a musculo-skeletal pain.

Some warm packs locally can help too.

Hope you will find this answer helpful!

If you have any other questions, please don't hesitate to ask me again!

Wishing all the best,

Dr. Iliri

Note: For further queries related to coronary artery disease and prevention, click here.

Above answer was peer-reviewed by : Dr. Chakravarthy Mazumdar
doctor
Answered by
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Dr. Ilir Sharka

Cardiologist

Practicing since :2001

Answered : 9541 Questions

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I Have Had A Recurring Pain In My Back, Near

I have had a recurring pain in my back, near my left shoulder blade. I've also been doing a lot of painting of my house over the last two months so obviously this could be a muscular thing. However, the pain is staying pretty much in that one spot, and I am nervous about a possible lung or heart connection. I have a doctor appointment for next Tuesday, and it is only via video. How do I know if the shoulderblade pain is serious or muscle-related?